Water Management

The 25 mg/l limit is the equivalent of two teaspoons of silt in an Olympic-size swimming pool

Water is used on mine and quarry sites for various purposes, such as controlling dust and as part of processing.

Mines and quarries test water discharges on at least a monthly basis and treat it to ensure water quality is within acceptable levels. Companies are required to submit regular repots to the government to ensure they are in compliance with all rules and regulations.

For example, the maximum suspended solids concentration in a grab sample is 50 mg/l, and the maximum monthly average of suspended solids concentration is 25 mg/l, levels which are widely considered safe for the environment and aquatic life. To put that in perspective, the 25 mg/l limit is the equivalent of two teaspoons of silt in an Olympic-size swimming pool

Water being released back into a river or lake is often cleaner after it has been used in a mine or quarry than it was beforehand. Companies also often recycle water on-site to reduce the amount they use.

We are not aware of any cases in Nova Scotia where blasting harmed a neighbouring property’s well or a community’s water supply. This concern is simply unfounded.

Buffer zones, and other mitigation measures such as ditches and berms, help prevent run-off and other impacts on rivers, streams, ponds, lakes and wetlands. For example, mine, quarry and pit operations generally have to be at least 30 metres from neighbouring watercourses.

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